Personality Plays a Role

PersonalityAs a commercial real estate broker, every time we engage in a deal we always have one key thing in common with our clients and that is: we are both on the same team, with the same goal of getting the deal done.  However, it is not as simple as it may sound and the road tends to be bumpy at times as we come across many different types of personalities along the way.  When dealing with different personalities, naturally, some are easier to work with than others.  In this article we will explore a few types of personalities who may (at times) be difficult to work with.  We will discuss these personalities and ways to work best with each of them.

Before we dive into the different personality types, lets talk a bit about personality and personality in a professional capacity.  Personality is the sum of characteristics and traits that define a person’s typical thoughts, emotions, and behaviors over time.  Personality styles or types that do not mesh well together can result in conflict.   Problems can occur over the way that people prefer to accomplish tasks or interact and communicate with one another.  It is important to always keep in mind to be flexible with your style of communication depending on the personalities you are dealing with.

  1. The Hostile

Dealing with a hostile type requires both tact and strength.  You must deal with these personality types fairly.  It would be smart to help these individuals meet as many of their needs as possible without reinforcing their aggressiveness or discriminating in their favor.  Also, avoid interactions with them that encourage intense emotions.

  1. The Chronic Complainer

These individuals tend to be faultfinding, blaming, and certain about what should be done but they never seem able to correct the situation themselves.  They often have a point and bring up relevant and real problems, but their complaining is not effective.  Coping with complainers involves listening and asking clarifying questions, and not immediately apologizing for the situation at hand.  Once you gather the facts, create a problem-solving attitude and plan.  Be serious and supportive.  Your positive and proactive attitude will affect their attitude and the negativity should subside, at least for a short while.

  1. The Yes-Man

We have all come across “the yes-man” in our professional careers.  These are those who are very nice and agree with your ideas fully until action is required.  These types typically are less interested in being helpful and more interested in approval seeking.  Instead of letting them go along with everything you are saying, ask their opinion and tell them that you are willing to compromise because you know they will be fair in the decision-making.

  1. The Know-It-All

There are two “know-it-all” types: the truly competent, productive, self-assured, genuine expert and the partially informed person convinced that he or she is an expert.  The true expert may act superior, stubborn, and impatient with differing opinions, but when you deal with a true expert you must do all of your homework thoroughly for that person to see and respect you as a true equal.  The partially informed “expert” is relatively easy to deal with and can be gently confronted with the facts.

  1. The Pessimist

Be sure not to argue with a pessimist, nor immediately offer solutions to the difficulties predicted by the pessimist.  Instead, make optimistic statements showing that change is possible then brainstorm together how you can get there as a team.  It is also important to discuss the worst possible consequences for those changes to show that you are realistic to the fact that things may fail, however, the outcomes won’t be major.

  1. The Staller

There is always a personality type who puts off decisions for fear that someone will be unhappy.  Unlike “the yes-man,” the staller is truly interested in being helpful.  With these personality types, don’t make a demand for quick action.  Instead, help the staller examine the facts and make compromises or develop alternative plans.  Give the staller reassurance about their decision and support the effective carrying-out of the decision.

 

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